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Carpe Colloquium! The Best and Worst Trends in Social Media

This blog post first appeared on KStreetCafe.com

There are a lot of grassroots advocacy social media trends, and many of them won’t help you reach your grassroots persuasion goals. As you plan your 2014 outreach, you should be aware of the social media trends – the good and the bad. I had the opportunity to engage Alan Rosenblatt (@DrDigiPol / www.TurnerStrategies.com) to teach at my annual Innovate to Motivate Conference. I don’t get to attend every ...

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Which Organizations Are Trusted Most On Capitol Hill?

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

Some interesting research from David K. Rehr, PhD, CEO of TransparaGov, Inc. and Professor at the Graduate School of Political Management at George Washington University, has revealed what congressional staff really think about the various institutions that lobby them. There’s good news for state and local governments, non-profits and small business (and even the federal government) but mixed news for corporations and unions. Although the research was conducted with congressional staff and not ...

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Five Reasons The NRA Won The Recent Gun Control Debate That Have Nothing To Do With Politics

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

No matter one’s position on gun control, there are lessons we can learn from the recent battle on background checks. According to Gallup, Over 90% of the public supports background checks for all gun purchases, yet the measure failed to pass the U.S. Senate.

According to most published sources, the reason is simple: the NRA has tons of money and threatened to “primary” those who voted against their will in the next election. If ...

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How Special Interests Won and Lost the Budget and Sequester Fights

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

A couple weeks ago, the U.S. Senate adopted numerous “message” amendments to the 2014 budget resolution.  The message amendments are nonbinding, but reveal the causes that have momentum for the “real” budget fight later. According to

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‘Own The Awkward’ And Three Other Presentation Lessons from Senator Marco Rubio’s State Of The Union Response

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

It’s that time again to see what, if anything, we can learn from those who have to influence legions of people who do not report to them, do not know them personally, and could not care less about public policy. . . . namely, our elected officials.  ...

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Four Presentation Lessons from President Obama’s State of the Union Speech

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

Even political junkies admit that the State of the Union (SOTU) speech can be tough for the President delivering it. It’s a list of policy proposals that can cause one to fall into a trance, regardless of their value or importance. Kind of like some of the presentations you may have to deliver for your organization.

Thus, it’s an exacting task to make it persuasive and engaging. Here are some lessons we can learn ...

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The Right Way for Businesses To Engage In Politics In 2013

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

It’s time to reflect upon what we can learn from business involvement in politics during 2012. There is rich material for us to learn from, and I could write about much more than this column allows. However, I have prioritized those concerns that apply ...

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The Top Underdog Persuaders of 2012

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

People with Little Name Recognition Can Yield Great Influence

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Lessons From Obama’s Victory And Romney’s Loss That You Can Apply To Your Cause

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

A political campaign is a lot like your life — it’s a series of connected moves intended to get others to buy-in to your ideas and to you. There are several learning moments you can take from the presidential campaigns and apply the next time you need buy-in for your concept, product or cause.

1. Build from Your Strengths

So many organizations (and individuals) feel they need to grow from shoring up their weaknesses. While ...

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The Final Three Persuasion Lessons from the Final Presidential Debate: Obama’s Zingers vs. Romney’s Restraint

This blog post first appeared on Forbes.com

In my last post, I shared some persuasion lessons from the first Presidential and Vice Presidential debates. Because each debate reveals new persuasion tactics and lessons, I couldn’t resist writing a sequel to my Continue Reading →

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